So how’s your team? Are they motivated, engaged and able to excel?

Over the course of my career, I’ve had the opportunity to lead teams from 30 globally to 15 domestically, the majority virtual. Each team has been very different in terms of function, collaboration and motivation.

Here are some tips I’ve learned over the years on how to lead and motivate teams:

Coach individually. Make sure you have one-to-one time with each team member on a regular basis. This will enable you to assess the strengths and weaknesses of each employee, how they are evolving and how their job aligns with their future career goals. If virtual, use Skype video, nothing replaces face-to-face interaction.

Provide opportunities for motivation. Find out what their long-term career goals are and make sure that some aspect – if not the majority – aligns with those goals. You’ll have a happier, more engaged and motivated staff member if you do. If they do not align, challenge the employee to develop a project that aligns with their goals and also the company’s goals.

Be accessible. And mean it. If global, some portion of your workday should overlap with members of your team and all team members should feel comfortable contacting you directly. Keep your virtual door open and your office door open. Be willing to stop what you are doing to address their concerns with an open and positive attitude.

Be transparent. One habit that many new managers have is to keep information confidential – often as a way to demonstrate power – some more seasoned managers may do this out of fear. There is no better way to alienate your team. Be transparent in your communication, your plans and with the direction of your division and company.

Have clear expectations. And communicate these often and well. Ensure each team member understands the expectations of their role, their interaction with the overall team and the company. Encourage them to improve and expand upon those expectations and provide the support needed to do so.

Be prepared to adapt. Your leadership style will evolve with your team and should meet each employee where they are. Translation: adapt your leadership style for each team member. Each individual is different and will require a different approach from you over time. A one-size fits all approach to leadership will definitely leave you lonely at the top without many followers.

For those of you leading large teams, the tips above would apply to your direct reports; however, make sure you have an opportunity to engage with the full team on a regular basis – either formally or informally.

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